May 7th on 7th

 

ForĀ 7th on 7th, I take a blog subscriber’s seventh page and show you how I’d improve it for the upcoming #pg70pit contest. See the #70pit16 contest schedule here.

7th on 7th

THE ORIGINAL PAGE

ā€“ his musculature hugging them. He could be a model for the cover of GQ or Menā€™s Health. I felt my eyelashes fluttering involuntarily ā€“ was I batting my eyes flirtatiously, or just trying to focus? And then our eyes metā€¦and locked. I could have sworn his eyes changed colors like a mood ring. It felt like we had gone through eternity together. I felt the strongest connection between this stranger (and yet not a stranger) and me. Then he lowered his eyes quickly and stated, ā€œWalking and texting can kill you. I apologize. Itā€™s just dangerousā€¦you couldā€™ve run into that door,ā€ he smirked.

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Working with a Book Cover Designer

I don’t believe in judging a person by his or her appearance, but I definitely judge a book by its cover, and so do readers.Just say no to amateurish design.Ā You want readers to take you seriously, don’t you?

If youĀ care about your book, you need to care about your cover. As a former graphic designer,Ā it’s easy for me to tell, based on cover alone, most indie-published books from professionally published ones. Some small presses hire amateur designers, too. Here are some tips to avoid amateur designs and get the best design for your book (or your buck).

7 Tips for Authors Working with a Book Cover Designer

7 Tips for Working with a Book Cover Designer:

  • Unless you’reĀ a trained designer, your design ideas will likely be derivative of visual cliches you’re used to seeing.
  • Saying “do whatever you want” can often be paralyzing to a designer with a thousand ideas.
  • Therefore, give theĀ professional designerĀ directionĀ but notĀ management. Ask for a creative brief, a tool whichĀ helps the designer understand what you want. Give the designer a few ideas to get him or her going, and then let the pro do his or her job.
  • It’s often better to say what youĀ don’t likeĀ than what youĀ do. “Can we avoid the colorĀ orange?” is better than “My favorite color isĀ purple. I want itĀ purple.”
  • If you provide images or ideas, make it clear that they areĀ toĀ inspire, not requireĀ the designer to follow them.
  • Create a Pinterest board of your favorite book covers to understand what styles you like. It can also be a useful addition to a creative brief. (SharingĀ this with your designer will be especially helpful if you hire a newbie designer.)
  • Know your genre. A good book cover gives the reader an expectation of what the pages inside hold.

cover-designs

If you’re working with a traditional publisher, they will have an in-house design team.

If you’re self-publishing or working with a small press that hires freelancers, here’s a round-up of cover designers.

If you are absolutely confident in your ability to DIY, here’s a tutorial to get you started. However, IĀ strongly recommendĀ researching typography basics before trying to make a cover yourself. Specifically learn hierarchy, legibility, and how to pair fonts. Creative Market has consistently solidĀ typefaces. Stay away from Papyrus, Comic Sans, Impact, Copperplate, and Scriptina. If a display, handwriting, or script font is pre-installed on your computer, you can bet it’s a cliche. I also recommendĀ learning fromĀ the good, the bad, and the ugly book covers at The Book Designer’s eBook Cover Design contests.

Click to Tweet: 7 Tips for Authors Working with a Book Cover Designer via @larathelark http://ctt.ec/JWS8T+

pg70pit writing contest logo

February 7th on 7th

This is 2016’s first 7th on 7th! Where I take a blog subscriber’s seventh page and show you how I’d improve it for the upcoming #pg70pit contest. See the #70pit16 contest schedule here. See more about how to enter the contest here.

7th on 7th

THE ORIGINAL PAGE

“Got ya!” Zane snarled. I saw a hand grab Arloā€™s arm, so I took a giant step backward.Ā “Hey!” Arlo squeaked. I heard his pack hit the pavement before the door closed.
You might be wondering why I didn’t rush to the aid of my best friend. The simple truth is, I couldn’t. I wanted to, but my feet were stuck to the floor. I could move neither backward nor forward. It was the darndest thing. Continue reading