[Download] Printable 2019 Quarterly Calendar

Well, I’m officially registered to start my MFA in a matter of weeks. Weeks—eek! I just bought a new weekly planner (I buy the July—June ones), and since my academic year is going into 2019, I figured I should probably print out my quarterly calendars for 2019, too. So good news: you don’t have to wait until December or January for next year’s calendar!

Near the end of 2015, I made a post about time management, which included free downloads to help you get organized, including a Gantt Chart Excel template and a printable blank quarterly calendar.

Plan Several Months at Once with a Quarterly Calendar

I’ve been using this quarterly calendar since 2015 as a family planner, color-coding events and appointments for each family member. We can see the whole year at a glance, and I use it daily! It also works really well for planning out projects. You could use highlighters to create Gantt Charts on your calendar.

These are super simple, and I’m letting you download them for free. The only conditions are that you may not upload this calendar to your own site, you may not redistribute it (you can send people here, though), and you can’t profit from the calendar in any way. If you want to profit from a quarterly calendar, you’ll have to make one yourself, from scratch. ❤

Subscribe to my blog (don’t worry, you won’t get many updates from me!), and then download the grayscale or color calendar by clicking on the links in this sentence or on either image link below:


Related posts

Love charts? Love planning? Need help with either? You might be interested in these posts:


What are you Most looking forward to in 2019?

Download Color 2018 Calendar

Printable 2018 Quarterly Calendar

Happy New Year!

Near the end of 2015, I made a post about time management, which included free downloads to help you get organized for the new year, including a Gantt Chart Excel template and a printable blank quarterly calendar.

Plan Several Months at Once with a Quarterly Calendar

I’ve been using this quarterly calendar since 2015 as a family planner, color-coding events and appointments for each family member. We can see the whole year at a glance, and I use it daily! It also works really well for planning out projects. You could use highlighters to create Gantt Charts on your calendar.

Continue reading

Printable 2017 Quarterly Calendar

Happy Hanukkah and Merry Christmas!

Near the end of 2015, I made a post about time management, which included free downloads to help you get organized for the new year, including a Gantt Chart Excel template and a printable blank quarterly calendar.

Plan a Month’s Worth of Projects with a Gantt chart

Here’s what the Gantt Chart template looks like:

gantt chart

Track your progress AND plan out your month so you know which tasks you should work on each day.

Plan Several Months at Once with a Quarterly Calendar

Continue reading

Working with a Book Cover Designer

I don’t believe in judging a person by his or her appearance, but I definitely judge a book by its cover, and so do readers.Just say no to amateurish design. You want readers to take you seriously, don’t you?

If you care about your book, you need to care about your cover. As a former graphic designer, it’s easy for me to tell, based on cover alone, most indie-published books from professionally published ones. Some small presses hire amateur designers, too. Here are some tips to avoid amateur designs and get the best design for your book (or your buck).

7 Tips for Authors Working with a Book Cover Designer

7 Tips for Working with a Book Cover Designer:

  • Unless you’re a trained designer, your design ideas will likely be derivative of visual cliches you’re used to seeing.
  • Saying “do whatever you want” can often be paralyzing to a designer with a thousand ideas.
  • Therefore, give the professional designer direction but not management. Ask for a creative brief, a tool which helps the designer understand what you want. Give the designer a few ideas to get him or her going, and then let the pro do his or her job.
  • It’s often better to say what you don’t like than what you do. “Can we avoid the color orange?” is better than “My favorite color is purple. I want it purple.”
  • If you provide images or ideas, make it clear that they are to inspire, not require the designer to follow them.
  • Create a Pinterest board of your favorite book covers to understand what styles you like. It can also be a useful addition to a creative brief. (Sharing this with your designer will be especially helpful if you hire a newbie designer.)
  • Know your genre. A good book cover gives the reader an expectation of what the pages inside hold.

cover-designs

If you’re working with a traditional publisher, they will have an in-house design team.

If you’re self-publishing or working with a small press that hires freelancers, here’s a round-up of cover designers.

If you are absolutely confident in your ability to DIY, here’s a tutorial to get you started. However, I strongly recommend researching typography basics before trying to make a cover yourself. Specifically learn hierarchy, legibility, and how to pair fonts. Creative Market has consistently solid typefaces. Stay away from Papyrus, Comic Sans, Impact, Copperplate, and Scriptina. If a display, handwriting, or script font is pre-installed on your computer, you can bet it’s a cliche. I also recommend learning from the good, the bad, and the ugly book covers at The Book Designer’s eBook Cover Design contests.

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