Don’t Write Comics (How to Write Comics)

In this four-part series of articles on LitReactor, you’ll hear from Kelly Thompson, Kickstarter crowdfunding author legend and the writer behind Heart In A Box (Dark Horse Comics, 2015). Kelly also writes Hawkeye, Phasma, Star Wars, Ghostbusters, A-Force, Jem & The Holograms, Misfits, Power Rangers: Pink, and Mega Princess, a creator-owned middle grade comic book series.

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Thompson’s Hawkeye is pitched as Veronica Mars meets superheroes. Shop Volume One from a local indie bookseller at IndieBound

Don’t Write Comics: How to Write Comics Part One

If you’re interested in comics solely because you think it might be easy or that it might be a shortcut to another end (like having a movie made of your comic) let me just stop you right here and point you towards the exit.  While it’s true that some screenplays get reverse engineered into comics, and then after being successful comics are turned into successful films (30 Days of Night springs to mind), there’s nothing “quick and easy” about making comics. In fact, if you’re not well connected to artists (and possibly some publishers) and/or willing to lay out your own money upfront in some cases, then it can be the very opposite of quick and easy. In order to make good comics, I truly believe you have to already love comics. It’s the love that’s going to get you through.

Identify What You’re Writing
Read, Read, Read
Getting Professional Help


Part Two

So, against all my advice last time, you’re still planning to write a comic book series, huh?  And you’ve done all your research as detailed in Part I, right?

All right then, let’s talk about what you need to pull together in order to pitch the project to publishing houses.  

What You’ll Need
Specifications
The Script [Also check out my (Lara’s) post on Formatting a Graphic Novel]
Stumbling Blocks
Accepting Reality


Part Three

Now comes the hard part. Because now you have to find someone way more talented than yourself to invest emotionally, mentally, and physically in your project.

And if you want the really good art, you’re probably going to have to pay for it. 

Paying Is Key
Sequential Pages Are King
Where to Look
‘The Right’ Artist


Part Four

I always recommend using an agreement, whether you are strangers or best friends, because no matter how well-intentioned everyone is at the outset it never hurts to have clarity between all parties, and a clarity that is written down, dated, and signed, is best.

Agreements
Collaboration

70pit16—What Next?

The entry windows for this year’s #pg70pit (#70pit16) have closed, and slushies are reading and scoring entries through July 5th.

Each entry has at least four readers, judging on a scale of 1 (needs work) to 3 (I want to read more!). The cohosts and I will look our 2.5 and 3 scores and from those, choose the entries with the highest average scoring entries to feature on our blogs.

So what should you do now?

  1. Join the Twitter Party
  2. Get your query letter ready
  3. Check the Top Hits playlist to see if your entry got a vote of confidence from a slushie.
  4. If you didn’t make the playlist…
  5. If you did make the playlist…
  6. If your entry wins…
  7. If you get an agent request…

Continue reading

Giveaway + Pitching and Submission Course

There are a few days left to enter my giveaway for Marvel’s Pride & Prejudice graphic novel. To enter, click here.

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In other news, the StoryWorldCon courses now have their own website: StoryCadet.com.

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The Cadet Course (for pitching and submitting your stories) will start June 8 and go for eight weeks. Find out the different pricing options and the schedule here. If you purchase the complete workshop before June 1, you get an extra $10 off!

Curious about what it takes to become a freelance editor? Soon I’ll be doing another #AskEditor series and sharing my chat with my 2015 intern about how I got into editing and my advice for freelancers-to-be.